What is the terminal monitor command?

By default, when you log in to a Cisco device via Telnet/SSH, you will not see log messages for that device. To view the logs of the Cisco devices to which you have logged in via Telnet/SSH, enter the teminal monitor command in privileged EXEC mode.

terminal monitor command

#terminal monitor

Fig. terminal monitor
Fig. terminal monitor

Example of the terminal monitor command

The following is a simple example of the terminal monitor command.

When there is no terminal monitor command

I am telnetting from R1 to R2 (192.168.12.2) and shutdown -> no shutdown on R2 Se0/0. At that time, the log of the interface status is not displayed.

R1#telnet 192.168.12.2
Trying 192.168.12.2 ... Open


User Access Verification

Password:
R2>enable
Password:
R2#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
R2(config)#interface serial 0/0
R2(config-if)#shutdown
R2(config-if)#no shutdown

When you enter the terminal monitor

After logging in to R2 from R1 via Telnet, enter the terminal monitor command and then shutdown -> no shutdown on Se0/0. Then you can see the log of the interface status.

R1#telnet 192.168.12.2
Trying 192.168.12.2 ... Open


User Access Verification

Password:
R2>enable
Password:
R2#terminal monitor
R2#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
R2(config)#interface serial 0/0
R2(config-if)#shutdown
R2(config-if)#
*Mar  1 00:06:17.335: %LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface Serial0/0, changed state to administratively down
R2(config-if)#no shutdown
R2(config-if)#
*Mar  1 00:06:25.983: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Serial0/0, changed state to up
R2(config-if)#
You need to enable the logging monitor command on the destination R2. However, the logging monitor command is enabled by default, so you don’t need to configure it explicitly.